ATalking History Project

 

The McKay Commission

(New York State Special Commission on Attica) Hearings


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Commission Sessions and Summaries

New York City Hearings ~ April 19, 1972 (Morning)

PDF files:   part 1   part 2

Summaries and Witnesses:

Part 1: New York City Public Hearings, pages 495-549. Herman Schwartz is a professor of law at the State University of New York at Buffalo. He has represented groups of prisoners at Attica on such issues as medical care, better pay for prison work, and men who were punished unfairly within the prison. He visited Attica on September 9th, and he and Arthur Eve were allowed access by the prisoners into the prisoner controlled areas to conduct negotiations. Schwartz gives detailed testimony of his discussions with prisoners.

Part 2: New York City Public Hearings, pages 550-614. Schwartz continues his testimony about his negotiations with the inmates during the uprising throughout the morning session. Schwartz explains how the inmates were politically organized and strongly unified. Schwartz discusses how the prisoners felt betrayed by broken promises made in the past by the state.

New York City Hearings ~ April 19, 1972 (Afternoon)

PDF files:   part 1   part 2

Summaries and Witnesses:

Part 1: New York City Public Hearings, pages 615-685. Mr. McKay recapitulates what the commission has covered thus far. Steven Rosenfeld testifies about statistics gathered about inmates from Attica from the period of September 9th to the 13th. Rosenfeld discusses age, education, and ethnicity as influential variables on the uprising. Charles Ray Carpenter, an inmate at Attica, testifies to the commission about events during and surrounding the uprising.

Part 2: New York City Public Hearings, pages 685-760. Clarence Jones is an editor and publisher of the New York Amsterdam News, and he is also an attorney. Jones testifies for the duration of the afternoon session about his invitation from Governor Rockefeller's office to go to Attica during the disturbance, upon request of the inmates. He discusses the requests made by the inmates, particularly the request of criminal amnesty for the inmates' actions during the uprising.

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